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Conductor wins workplace injury suit after falling off train

A railroad conductor who worked for CSX Transportation has won a workplace injury lawsuit against the company, reports The Madison Record. Many plaintiffs who file such claims use legal financing from lawsuit loan providers to help them fund their cases.

Richard Burden, of Kentucky, received injuries stemming from an equipment accident in 2007. Burden was allegedly injured when he released the vertical handbrakes on a tank car during the evening.

As he exited the train car, Burden fell and sustained multiple injuries. According to sources, the train conductor broke his leg, suffered brain trauma and hurt his lower back. In addition, Burden required surgery on his neck for multiple disc injuries.

The lawsuit stated the employee could not work after the fall and a judge determined he could not be hired again.

On November 10, a jury awarded Burden a $9 million award for the injuries he sustained while on the job. The original award amount was slightly higher, but the jurors found him to be ten percent responsible for his own negligence. CSX allegedly offered their former employee $600,000 to settle before the case went to trial.

Brain damaged police officer wins $17 million malpractice lawsuit

A settlement has been reached in a medical malpractice lawsuit between a police officer and the University of Illinois at Chicago Medical Center, reports the Proviso Herald. Many people who file such cases use lawsuit funding from lawsuit loan providers to help them finance their cases.

Stone Park, Illinois police office George Nissen reportedly arrived at the hospital in February 2005 after suffering from a stroke possibly caused while on the job. As doctors rushed to drain fluid from his brain, they allegedly neglected to notice the pressure inside his cranium, which was reportedly at “dangerous levels,” according to reports.

The following day, Nissen reportedly suffered a brain stem herniation and now lives as a quadriplegic. The former police officer can only communicate via eye contact and head movements in addition to no longer being able to speak or eat on his own.

Attorneys for Nissen blamed an inexperienced nurse who was allegedly not qualified to care for patients suffering from neurological injuries. The lawsuit also blamed a healthcare staffing agency and two nurses for negligence in treating Nissen.

Lawyers for the plaintiffs and defendants reached a $17.7 million settlement the day before the case would be heard before a trial jury.

Man sues school after student crashes his car

A man recently filed a car accident lawsuit against a New Jersey vocational school that allowed his car to be driven by a student who ultimately crashed it, reports The Star-Ledger. Many people who file such cases use legal loans from lawsuit advance providers to help them fund their cases.

The lawsuit Donnie Scott has filed states the school is responsible for letting a 17-year-old student drive the car off school property. The student, whose name has not been released, reportedly drove 60 mph in a 35 mph zone and crashed into an electrical power box, according to police records.

Scott says the bill to fix his car amounted to more than $20,000 and seeks $45,000 to pay for those costs along with the damage sustained to the electrical box. In the lawsuit, Scott alleges the principal said the school would pay for the damage but they never did. He also names the student as a defendant in the case.

The car was meant to be used as a tool for auto mechanics class but not for test driving, said Thomas Bistocchi, the school’s superintendent.

Man sues school after student crashes his car

A man recently filed a car accident lawsuit against a New Jersey vocational school that allowed his car to be driven by a student who ultimately crashed it, reports The Star-Ledger. Many people who file such cases use legal loans from lawsuit advance providers to help them fund their cases.

The lawsuit Donnie Scott has filed states the school is responsible for letting a 17-year-old student drive the car off school property. The student, whose name has not been released, reportedly drove 60 mph in a 35 mph zone and crashed into an electrical power box, according to police records.

Scott says the bill to fix his car amounted to more than $20,000 and seeks $45,000 to pay for those costs along with the damage sustained to the electrical box. In the lawsuit, Scott alleges the principal said the school would pay for the damage but they never did. He also names the student as a defendant in the case.

The car was meant to be used as a tool for auto mechanics class but not for test driving, said Thomas Bistocchi, the school’s superintendent.

Family sues Houston police department for wrongful death in a crash

The city of Houston has been sued by the family of a medical scientist at Baylor University after she died in a car accident with a speeding police vehicle, reports the Houston Chronicle. Many people who file such cases use lawsuit funding from legal loan providers to help them finance their cases.

Dr. Estela Medrano, 67, died after Houston police officer Kyle Dozier, 27, allegedly crashed into Medrano’s car as he was answering an emergency response call. The car accident lawsuit filed by the woman’s family cites misconduct and negligence, blaming Dozier for her wrongful death.

According to reports, the accident occurred as Medrano’s husband drove her home and turned into a driveway. As their vehicle turned, it crossed the path of Dozier’s cruiser which allegedly had no emergency lights or sirens in use at the time of the crash. The lawsuit also claims the police officer was driving at speed of 90 mph.

Current investigations have not revealed any truth to these allegations, but the inquiry is still in progress. Police reports state Dozier was responding to a “Priority 2″ call, which requires police officers to follow all traffic regulations, but use of emergency lights and sirens are not necessary.

Ex-NFL player sues league over disability benefits for helmet collision injury

Eric Shelton, a former running back for the Carolina Panthers, has sued the National Football League (NFL) over alleged withheld disability benefits related to an injury sustained during training camp, according to the New York Times.

Some people who file workplace injury lawsuits use legal loans from a lawsuit funding provider to help them finance their cases.

In the lawsuit, Shelton claims that the league’s disability panel misclassified his neck injury, which was allegedly caused by a helmet-to-helmet collision at training camp during his time on the workout squad of the Washington Redskins in 2008. He says the panel gave him benefits for a “degenerative” injury – one that appears after more than six to 12 months – rather than higher benefits for immediately, permanently harmful injuries.

“Talk is cheap – it’s easy to put out posters and public service announcements and levy fines for hits that occur on Sundays, but when a player is seriously injured on those hits, the league says something completely different,” Shelton’s attorney told the source.

The lawyer in charge of the NFL’s disability plan disagreed, saying that “the lawsuit requests that Mr. Shelton be placed in the highest category, which in part applies where a player is unable to work immediately following his NFL career. Mr. Shelton worked at a pharmacy until April 2009.”

Mississippi businessman settles lawsuit over 2009 car crash that killed two doctors

The $60 million lawsuit over a fatal 2009 car crash that claimed the lives of two doctors has ended with a settlement paid by a Jackson, Mississippi businessman, reports the Clarion-Ledger.

People looking to file their own litigation related to car crashes may wish to seek out a lawsuit loan from a plaintiff advance provider to help them finance their cases.

The two victims, Dr. Daniel Mark Pogue and his financee Dr. Lisa Dedousis, were killed when their pickup truck was hit by a Mercedes-Benz. The businessman who paid the settlement, Stuart Irby, was a passenger in the Mercedes. His wife Karen is currently serving an 18-year prison sentence for her role in the crash.

The lawsuit, filed by the victims’ estates, claims that Stuart Irby was responsible for the crash because he allegedly pulled his wife’s hair and hit her in the face just prior to the collision. Family members of the deceased dropped a lawsuit against Karen Irby and urged a judge to give her the minimum sentence after she plead guilty to two counts of culpable negligence manslaughter.

“This whole thing is a terrible tragedy, including for Karen Irby,” a lawyer for the doctors’ estates told the source.

Texas couple files medical malpractice lawsuit over ineffective tendon surgery

A Texas couple has filed a medical malpractice lawsuit against a Nederland physician who they claim failed to provide adequate treatment for a foot injury, reports the Southeast Texas Record. Other people seeking to litigate over medical malpractice may wish to seek out lawsuit funding from a legal loan provider to help finance their cases.

The plaintiffs, John and Crystal Shellabarger, filed the lawsuit based on surgery and post-operative care performed by Dr. Jimmy D. Bell at Renaissance Hospital-Groves. They allege that Bell did not employ the most effective techniques when he performed surgery to treat John’s tendon injury and that Bell did not immediately provide a referral to a competent physical therapist for post-operative physical therapy.

The Shellabargers, who are currently acting as their own counsel, are seeking special, general and exemplary damages in addition to pre- and post-judgement interest, costs and other relief.

The source states that Crystal Shellabarger claims to have lost John’s consortium, enjoyment, society and companionship, suffered mental anguish and incurred medical costs.

The litigation was filed in Jefferson County District Court, and Judge Bob Wortham is presiding over the lawsuit.

Botched flu shot leads Louisiana woman to sue

A woman in Bourg, Louisiana, has filed a lawsuit after a botched flu shot resulted in serious injuries to her shoulder, reports the Houma Courier. People who believe they have suffered injuries as a result of botched medical practices may wish to get a lawsuit advance from a legal loan provider to help them pay for their litigation.

The woman, Cynthia Thibodeaux, received a flu shot in September 2009 at the Terrebonne General Medical Center (TGMC) Outreach in Southland Mall from Mamie Ross, a nursing student at Fletcher Community College.

She claims that Ross “administered the shot with considerable force into the top of her right shoulder joint,” resulting in heavy bleeding that did not stop for 30 minutes. When the plaintiff could not lift her arm later in the day, she went to TGMC and was diagnosed with a torn rotator cuff and other problems that ultimately resulted in her needing surgery.

Thibodeaux’s attorney has filed for the creation of two review panels, one apiece to investigate the roles that TGMC and Fletcher Community College had in his client’s injury.

The petition is seeking damages of more than $50,000.

Houston-area woman sues Wal-Mart after she slips on store’s wet floor

A woman has sued a Wal-Mart in a suburb of Houston, Texas, after she slipped and fell inside the store, according to the Houston Chronicle. People who have been injured by a slip and fall on the property of a business and who believe they are entitled to compensation may be interested in seeking out a lawsuit cash advance from a legal loan provider to help them finance their lawsuits.

The woman, Beverly Johnson, was visiting a Wal-Mart franchise in Cypress, Texas, when she allegedly slipped on a wet spot on the store’s floor and fell to the ground. Johnson claimed in the lawsuit that the store was negligent because it had failed to place a warning sign regarding the wet floor anywhere near the spot where she slipped and fell.

Johnson filed the lawsuit on November 24 in Harris County District Court. According to the source, she is seeking compensatory and exemplary damages on top of compensation for her court costs.

According to the National Safety Council, more than 7.9 million Americans were injured in a fall in 2007.